Domains Of Disappointment For Contemporary Teachers

“It is my sincere belief that new teachers who are aware of the organizational and societal contexts in which they must work and who understand the nature of their clients are better able to withstand the induction period of teaching and eventually participate in the reconceptualization of the profession.”

DomainExpectationsReality
Teaching tasks Autonomy Rules and procedures
(formalization)
Opportunity to exercise
personal judgment
Routine work
Challenging work Ambiguity regarding goals
Goal clarity Insecurity
Security
StudentsMotivation to learn Apathy
Willingness to respond to
reason
Behavior problems
Respect for authority
Societal ContextPublic support and
appreciation
Public criticism and
impugning of motives
Adequate resources Increasing pressure for
greater results
Professional discretion Diminishing resources
Legal and governmental
constraints
Higher EducationTraining based on technical skillsTraining based on general knowledge
Availability of scholarly
assistance
Research criticizing teachers
Opportunities for continuing
professional growth
Trivial in-service programs
Externally based
innovation
School improvement is
nonpolitical
School improvement is highly political
Innovations can leave schools worse off than before
Professional
activities
Collegiality Isolation
Cooperation between
teachers
Competition between teachers
Commitment to high ideals Commitment to material selfinterests

Daniel L. Duke. Teaching: The Imperiled Profession. State University of New York Press. ALBANY. 1984.

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