Santa’s Post-Christmas Performance Appraisal

Hi Nick. Take a seat. Thanks for coming. How’s the family? Reindeers doing well? I heard Rudolph was nursing a cold. Hope he’s okay. Now, look the reason we’re meeting today is to review this year’s performance and is part of the new performance appraisal system we have set up. All staff, the elves included, […]

Ball Bearings & The Scientific Selection of Workers

In most cases (particularly when the work to be done is intricate in its nature) the “development of the science” is the most important of the four great elements of the new management. There are instances, however, in which the “scientific selection of the workman” counts for more than anything else. A case of this […]

Teach Like A Showman

A good showman is a person that has a sense or knack for an effective presentation of an animal. Showmanship is the one area of exhibiting beef cattle over which you have the most control. In showmanship, you are judged on your abilities to control and present your steer or heifer to bring out its […]

‘Every one is forward to complain of the prejudices that mislead other men or parties, as if he were free, and had none of his own.’

“This being objected on all sides, it is agreed that it is a fault and an hindrance to knowledge. What now is the cure? No other but this, that every man should let alone others prejudices and examine his own. No body is convinced of his by the accusation of another; he recriminates by the […]

Teacher Burn-Out & Ascetic Altruism

“The problem is well-documented, and there are no doubt many factors which make teaching a difficult activity to sustain for long.” “But it does often turn out that it is precisely the teachers we respect the most, those whose selfless dedication to making something happen for other people is an inspiration, who burn out the […]

Domains Of Disappointment For Contemporary Teachers

“It is my sincere belief that new teachers who are aware of the organizational and societal contexts in which they must work and who understand the nature of their clients are better able to withstand the induction period of teaching and eventually participate in the reconceptualization of the profession.” Daniel L. Duke. Teaching: The Imperiled […]

On Why ‘The Schools We Need’ Have Never Been Progressive

“Opening with the foreboding words, “Failed Theories, Famished Minds,” Hirsch explains, “What chiefly prompts the writing of this book is our national slowness . . . to cast aside [the] faulty theories that have led to the total absence of a coherent, knowledge-based curriculum, but are nonetheless presented . . . as remedies for the […]

Andreas Schleicher’s Very Special Education

Andreas Schleicher works out of the OECD in Paris, and is best known for the the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), “a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students.” According to a January 2010 presentation given to the Quality of Childhood Group […]

Quintilian On The Self-Discipline Of Teaching

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus was born about 35 A.D. at Calagurris. Young Quintilian was sent to Rome for his education and among his teachers were the famous grammaticus Remmius Palaemon, and the rhetorician Domitius Afer. After returning to his native land, he was brought back to Rome in 68 A.D. by Galba, then governor of Hispania […]

The Politics of Education Research & “What Works” Randomised Controlled Trials

“Political and ideological differences, or perceived differences, are often argued-out explicitly, but sometimes the conflict is carried out via “proxies”. In the case of the deep divisions about educational policies and practices, for the past couple of decades the battle has been pursued on both fronts – explicitly, but also via proxies in the area […]

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