Ball Bearings & The Scientific Selection of Workers

In most cases (particularly when the work to be done is intricate in its nature) the “development of the science” is the most important of the four great elements of the new management. There are instances, however, in which the “scientific selection of the workman” counts for more than anything else. A case of this […]

Charismatic Qualities & Their Regeneration

“Once charismatic qualification has become an impersonal quality, which can be transmitted through various and at first purely magic means, it has begun its transformation from a personal gift that can be tested and proven but not transmitted and acquired, into a capacity that, in principle, can be taught and learned. Thus charismatic qualification can […]

Teach Like A Showman

A good showman is a person that has a sense or knack for an effective presentation of an animal. Showmanship is the one area of exhibiting beef cattle over which you have the most control. In showmanship, you are judged on your abilities to control and present your steer or heifer to bring out its […]

“Stick close to your desks and never go to sea / … you all may be rulers of the Queen’s Navee”

Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore Sir Joseph Porter, KCB: When I was a lad I served a term As office boy to an Attorney’s firm. I cleaned the windows and I swept the floor, And I polished up the handle of the big front door. Chorus: He polished up the handle of the big front […]

Andreas Schleicher’s Very Special Education

Andreas Schleicher works out of the OECD in Paris, and is best known for the the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), “a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students.” According to a January 2010 presentation given to the Quality of Childhood Group […]

‘Gove’s academies: 1980s idea rebranded?’ by Mike Baker

BBC News, August 2010 “In education, if you wait long enough, most ideas come full circle. This week saw Royal Assent for the Academies Bill, one of the fastest pieces of education law ever enacted. But while it could have far-reaching implications, the Academies Act actually turns back the clock to a reform brought in […]

Lessons from London Schools, Self-Promotion and the Myth of Education Research

We were a little undecided as to whether or not to write this post because of the youthfulness of those involved in Lessons from London Schools: Investigating the Success (LLS), the study that we will critique, and not wanting for youthful enthusiasm to be overly dampened by what is to be said about the LLS […]

‘You are to be in all things regulated and governed,’ said the gentleman, ‘by fact.’

Hard Times Charles Dickens CHAPTER II MURDERING THE INNOCENTS Thomas Gradgrind, sir. A man of realities. A man of facts and calculations. A man who proceeds upon the principle that two and two are four, and nothing over, and who is not to be talked into allowing for anything over. Thomas Gradgrind, sir—peremptorily Thomas—Thomas Gradgrind. […]

‘In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!’

This year is the 160th anniversary of the publication of Charles Dickens’ Hard Times, and it remains as relevant to battles over education and schooling as ever. CHAPTER I THE ONE THING NEEDFUL ‘Now, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing […]

When is a teacher unqualified, @TristramHuntMP?

The question to be addressed in this short post is prompted by statements made on a number of occasions by Tristram Hunt, Labour’s shadow Education Secretary. Mr. Hunt has recently made a number of public remarks about how the Tories have been wrong to allow schools to employ unqualified teachers (E.g. here, here, and here). […]

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